Articles

Television Transferring on to the Internet

In Uncategorized on November 30, 2010 by JP League

Online video is going to replace television channels and the television in general.

         A growing trend with the Internet is the making and showing of videos. Websites like YouTube, Google videos, and Hulu are shaping the way television shows are distributed.

          Alan Greenblatt wrote in the CQ Researcher, “Viewers are ignoring broadcast schedules and watching programs via Internet ‘streams’ and iPod downloads”

          This is changing the future of the television. Greenblatt wrote, “. There’s an atmosphere of experimentation and uncertainty in the industry reminiscent of the dot-com boom, but television and advertising executives insist that the future of TV is bright.”

          Another thing changing the industry is the internet’s version of home movies. Greenblatt wrote, “Today’s proliferation of media platforms is triggering an explosion of user-generated content and challenging the television industry’s historic business model.”

          A reason that the Internet is hurting televisions is the availability of the internet. Greenblatt wrote, “One person now can watch a program in many different ways, whether downloaded onto a video iPod, clipped into smaller bites for snacking on cell phones or YouTube or streamed over the Internet on a network’s own Web site.”

          There is hope for television’s future success. Instead of using only the Internet for videos, they will use the Internet in conjunction with television. Greenblatt wrote, “Some industry experts predict that the new platforms — rather than ‘cannibalizing’ traditional TV — will increase its popularity by allowing people to catch up on shows they missed during their regular broadcast time. Television executives’ new mantra is that viewers can watch “what they want, when they want it, and how they want it.”

          Television still holds a large market share of the videos watched. Greenblatt wrote, “The broadcast networks’ audience share may be shrinking, and people may be uploading 70,000 videos a day onto YouTube but even the most popular ‘viral videos,’ which spread like a virus — such as the Mentos experiment — are watched by fewer people than a moderately successful network television show.”

          Greenblatt wrote, “There’s an atmosphere of experimentation and uncertainty in the industry reminiscent of the dot-com boom, but television and advertising executives insist that the future of TV is bright.”

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